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I just turned 30,000 miles on my 2009 R/T 6speed and from what I read in the owners manual its time to replace my spark plugs. The car runs fine that seems to be a little premature to replace the spark plugs. Does someone with more knowledge have any insight into this or did I read it wrong? Thanks for any input.
 

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I am not sure but I thought we had iridium plugs which should last 100k. I may be wrong, wouldn't be the first time though.
 

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if it has platnum or iridium plugs then they are good for 100k, if they are copper then they may need to be replaced but the only difference in plugs between the 6.1 and 5.7 is the heat range, and the 6.1 has platnum plugs not sure why they would put copper or any other plugs other than platnum in the 5.7, 16 spark plugs every 30k would add up.

Montrose
 

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I just turned 30,000 miles on my 2009 R/T 6speed and from what I read in the owners manual its time to replace my spark plugs. The car runs fine that seems to be a little premature to replace the spark plugs. Does someone with more knowledge have any insight into this or did I read it wrong? Thanks for any input.
The requirement for the 5.7 is a spark plug change at 30K.

30,000 Miles (50,000 km) or
30 Months Maintenance
Service Schedule
❏ Change the engine oil and engine oil
filter.
❏ Rotate tires.
❏ Replace the engine air cleaner filter.
❏ Replace the spark plugs (5.7L Engine).
❏ Adjust parking brake on vehicles
equipped with four-wheel disc brakes.
 

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I went with the dealer recommended service and had my plugs changed, put my bill at just a few dollars over $500 for the service. But I don't intend on buying a new car so it's worth the cost to me to keep this one as good as new. Especially with the lifetime powertrain warranty on my '09.
 

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I replaced them on my wifes 300C, and I think it was past due, at maybe 45,000 miles. They didn't look brand new, but they were in pretty good shape.
 

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NGK LZFR5C 11 in the R/T. 16 of them and may be copper core plugs.
 

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Hidden gotchas!

I've got a while to go before changing plugs, but since this came up, any warnings on doing this? Here's what I mean - changing plugs should be simple and not something you can screw up and waste your cylinder head. Plus it's gratifying to do work like this yourself. Nowadays there seem to be plenty of gotchas on simple things like this. For example, some Ford 4.6L engines have a problem with plugs blowing out of the motor because they only catch a few threads when they're installed. I remember the good old days of cast iron - could pull the plugs a million times and tighten them without a torque wrench until they felt right, with no problems.

Our plugs don't look difficult to get to. Can anyone comment on the following:

Aluminum threads in the head, right?

Anti-seize compound on the threads?

Dielectric grease on the plug ends?

Proper torque procedure?

Does anyone get crazy and index plugs anymore?

Anything else that could ruin our day?
 

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The alum heads could be a problem if you waited to long to change them, but I would think that would take a really long time before it happened.

When I did them in my wifes car, I didn't use anti seize, but I should have, but I did put the grease in the plug boots.

I would think indexing plugs on a hemi engine would be a waste of time. They are centrally located, and there is two of them. Indexing seemed more important on wedge engines, where the plug is kind of off to the side, and I think it was a waste of time even on those engines, but who knows you might pick up a HP or two.

I didn't use a torque wrench, I went by feel. The are pretty easy to get at, but I find its really tough to get good torque readings in places like that, and waste more time than any benefit you might gain.

Allow a few hours, its easy but with 16 of them, it will take a little time.
 

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well the heads are aluminum and the plugs have a taper seat so no anti-seize because it could cause an over torque and before any one says to do it remember what happens when you over torque a taper seat it turns it in to a funnel and the plugs will start moving more in to the chamber, as far as torque goes dry torque is between 12 to 14 FTLB never exceed 15ftld, use dielectric grease its real quick and easy hope this helps.

Montrose
 

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Hey there, do the NGK LZFR5C 11 plugs need to be gapped?

thanks, -Kevin
Most NGK plugs come Pre-gapped, but I ALWAYS check them. Settings call for .043.
 

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Most NGK plugs come Pre-gapped, but I ALWAYS check them. Settings call for .043.
OLD thread!!! Last ones I bought were gapped at 0.040 so I opened them up to 0.043
 

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OLD thread!!! Last ones I bought were gapped at 0.040 so I opened them up to 0.043
Always check the so called pre-gapped plug. They could have been banged up while moving around before you get them. BTW - I called and talked to NGK about their nickle plated copper plugs they make for MOPAR and they said to NOT use anti-sieze on the threads because they will over-torque. Install them clean and dry folks !
 

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The spark plug change interval is 30,000 miles because they run copper plugs, not platinum or iridium. You can go a little longer but even at 30,000 miles you'll feel a little better throttle response and slightly better mpg's from installing new plugs.

This is a pretty easy job to do yourself as well if you feel like attempting it. I've done mine twice already and both times it was simple and straightforward. All you need are some basic tools and then beyond that a swivel, magnetic socket, and a torque wrench. If you use anti-seize on the threads they come out nice and easy the next time around. If you put dielectric grease on the coilpack boots then those will come off easily as well. Takes about 2 hours if you're taking your time, closer to 1.5 hour if you're focused and efficient. The plugs cost about $75 or so for 16 of them, though you can get them for $55 if you can get a Chrysler employee discount on parts.
 

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Always check the so called pre-gapped plug. They could have been banged up while moving around before you get them. BTW - I called and talked to NGK about their nickle plated copper plugs they make for MOPAR and they said to NOT use anti-sieze on the threads because they will over-torque. Install them clean and dry folks !
Tom, I used anti-seize on my plugs and they came out just fine. How much more would they be over-torqued I wonder?

When I did my plugs both times they were pre-gapped to .040" so I had to open them up to .043" as well. I'm sure the car would still run fine at .040" but might as well open them up a little more for the little effort it takes.
 

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yeah i changed mine at 47k only cause i wasnt sure if the dealer or po changed them .. they looked good ..normal color guess i just did it for piece of mind now i know there done .. took me about 2 hrs.. easy job could have been faster but i was bs,in and having a few with some buddys
 

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Tom, I used anti-seize on my plugs and they came out just fine. How much more would they be over-torqued I wonder?

When I did my plugs both times they were pre-gapped to .040" so I had to open them up to .043" as well. I'm sure the car would still run fine at .040" but might as well open them up a little more for the little effort it takes.
Carl, the engineer at NGK said it was possible for them to be as much as 7 foot lbs off. If you get lucky and don't damage the seat or stretch the threads, you most certainly will open the gap on the ground strap. Trust the engineers, that's why they get paid the big bucks. LOL :pop:
 

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Not putting anti-seize on spark plug threads is contrary to everything I've heard or learned. Especially with aluminum heads. It helps prevent galling and helps keeping the plug threads from heat seizing to the heads. I always put a light coat(a very little amount) on the threads with an acid brush. A little goes a long way.

Disclaimer: I am not refuting what anyone is saying here, nor what the engineers say. This is just my experiences.
 
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