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Discussion Starter #1
So i am in Arizona, and we have a lot of long roads with dessert on the sides, and pretty much nobody on these roads.

Took my challenger on some 0-60 test runs. I was trying different ways on getting the best times...

example ..

1. REving up to 1800RPM before take off, and also not revving up at all.
2. Auto Stick vs Regular drive mode
3. ESP fully off, partial off, and On for traction control .

Well i was getting high 4's and low 5's .. NOt sure how i got this below, i think its a glitch, it did feel great at take off but still there is no way i can get this right ? Couldnt get it again so not sure luck, or glitch.

 

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No that is not accurate and we have seen that before.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
No that is not accurate and we have seen that before.
ya i figured :sad: .

Off subject i guess, why do i see many people so interested in disabling the ESP completely even partial ? Won't that create more tire slip and not a better time ?

Still trying to understand the whole revving before take off, and if that is really helping on time or take off ?
 

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Well that sucks, because it's your "best time" now. Can you reset it so you can get more accurate readings?
 

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No that is not accurate and we have seen that before.
x3, there have been guys that have posted one and two second to 60 times too LOL.
 

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ya i figured :sad: .

Off subject i guess, why do i see many people so interested in disabling the ESP completely even partial ? Won't that create more tire slip and not a better time ?
Well they can be doing it for any of a number of reasons. Sometime people just want to lay a patch of rubber for the shear fun of it and traction control tends to hinder that. Another reason is when you are at the drag strip and running either drag radials or slicks you will want to do a burn out to heat your tires before a run, that's very hard to do if you have traction control fighting you.
 

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ya i figured :sad: .

Off subject i guess, why do i see many people so interested in disabling the ESP completely even partial ? Won't that create more tire slip and not a better time ?
Well they can be doing it for any of a number of reasons. Sometime people just want to lay a patch of rubber for the shear fun of it and traction control tends to hinder that. Another reason is when you are at the drag strip and running either drag radials or slicks you will want to do a burn out to heat your tires before a run, that's very hard to do if you have traction control fighting you.
Great, you beat me to it.
 

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My guess is some wheelspin or something. Doesn't seem accurate to me.

ESP off is more fun. Can't lay black patches with it on. Turn it off and it's smokeshow time! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
ok so its more for show than getting good times.

After you smoke them out, do you turn ESP back on before the 1/4 run for better traction?

Also guys , what is the key benefit on revving up the car before launch ? Is it really better take off time or is it quicker ?
 

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After you smoke them out, do you turn ESP back on before the 1/4 run for better traction?

Generally not if I'm running drag radials, no sense having anything interfer with your run. You don't need any torque nannies causing you a problem or dumping your car into limp mode. With slicks or drag radials you shouldn't spin coming off the line (if properly heated tires).

Also guys , what is the key benefit on revving up the car before launch ? Is it really better take off time or is it quicker ?
With drag radials and a higher than stock converter (3,200 rpm FTI converter) my best times have come by just flooring it from off idle and flashing the converter.
 

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With drag radials and a higher than stock converter (3,200 rpm FTI converter) my best times have come by just flooring it from off idle and flashing the converter.
The same results with me too..
 
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What does "flashing the converter" mean ?
That means mashing the throttle at an idle and letting the
converter automatically shoot up the rpms up to its pre set stall which for me is 2800 rpms maybe a bit higher, for Jon its around 3200 rpms which puts you into the power band.
 

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Traction control is designed to limit wheel slippage during acceleration, particularly on wet or icy roads. Many modern vehicles employ a form of electronic control to regulate power delivered to the wheels helping to eliminate wheel slip. This allows the driver to accelerate under control.
Modern traction control makes use of sensors used by the anti-lock brake system. These sensors detect when one tire is rotating at a different speed than the others. Most often this occurs when one wheel is slipping on an icy or wet road. At this point the tire begins to rotate at a faster rate than the other three tires because it is receiving less resistance and more power. When this happens the wheel loses traction. When this difference in rotation is detected the traction control system activates the brakes on those wheels spinning faster, bringing their speed in line with the other wheels. Other forms of traction control actually limit the amount of power the engine provides for any wheels that are spinning faster than the others. With all the wheels spinning at the same rate there is more vehicle stability and the car is less like to slide sideways.


With this in mind, people like me, feel when we are trying to get the best power/time from our car we do not want traction control other than hot tires as the breaking/power to the wheel reduction will reduce you out of the hole and even second and third gear shift rev up times in turn slowing you down. Hope this helps some.
 

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That means mashing the throttle at an idle and letting the
converter automatically shoot up the rpms up to its pre set stall which for me is 2800 rpms maybe a bit higher, for Jon its around 3200 rpms which puts you into the power band.
Thanks Alan !
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
Traction control is designed to limit wheel slippage during acceleration, particularly on wet or icy roads. Many modern vehicles employ a form of electronic control to regulate power delivered to the wheels helping to eliminate wheel slip. This allows the driver to accelerate under control.
Modern traction control makes use of sensors used by the anti-lock brake system. These sensors detect when one tire is rotating at a different speed than the others. Most often this occurs when one wheel is slipping on an icy or wet road. At this point the tire begins to rotate at a faster rate than the other three tires because it is receiving less resistance and more power. When this happens the wheel loses traction. When this difference in rotation is detected the traction control system activates the brakes on those wheels spinning faster, bringing their speed in line with the other wheels. Other forms of traction control actually limit the amount of power the engine provides for any wheels that are spinning faster than the others. With all the wheels spinning at the same rate there is more vehicle stability and the car is less like to slide sideways.


With this in mind, people like me, feel when we are trying to get the best power/time from our car we do not want traction control other than hot tires as the breaking/power to the wheel reduction will reduce you out of the hole and even second and third gear shift rev up times in turn slowing you down. Hope this helps some.
Thank you for this detailed explanation. Do you know when particular wheel is spinning faster than the rest and Traction Control is actually turned on and slowing it down ? Is there a visual we get ? I do see an icon flashing on and off real quick when i spin out, not sure what that is .

Not sure what you meant on your last paragraph. When you do your runs, you have Traction Control off the whole run ?

Also Dodge BOy and 70barcuda ,

How can i tell what my pre set stall is at ?

Guess i am still confused on what exactly this flashing the converter means.

How do i know if i am in my " power band " ?
 

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Thank you for this detailed explanation. Do you know when particular wheel is spinning faster than the rest and Traction Control is actually turned on and slowing it down ? Is there a visual we get ? I do see an icon flashing on and off real quick when i spin out, not sure what that is .

Not sure what you meant on your last paragraph. When you do your runs, you have Traction Control off the whole run ?

Also Dodge BOy and 70barcuda ,

How can i tell what my pre set stall is at ?

Guess i am still confused on what exactly this flashing the converter means.

How do i know if i am in my " power band " ?

Im presuming you have a factory stall converter in your car which i believe are set at 1600 to 1800 rpms which more than likely is giving you a slight low end bog when when you mash the throttle at an idle, as i said before
both 70Barcuda and myself both have high stall converters which allow us to launch at an idle and go immediately to 3000 rpms or better which eliminates the low end bog that the factory converter gives, when we launch at an idle and do this it is called "flashing your converter"
Usually from what ive seen the power band starts at over 3000 rpms and increases as the rpms go up, you will see that on your Dyno sheet. When you skip the range under 3000 rpms it will give much better low end performance.
 
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Discussion Starter #20
Im presuming you have a factory stall converter in your car which i believe are set at 1600 to 1800 rpms which more than likely is giving you a slight low end bog when when you mash the throttle at an idle, as i said before
both 70Barcuda and myself both have high stall converters which allow us to launch at an idle and go immediately to 3000 rpms or better which eliminates the low end bog that the factory converter gives, when we launch at an idle and do this it is called "flashing your converter"
Usually from what ive seen the power band starts at over 3000 rpms and increases as the rpms go up, you will see that on your Dyno sheet. When you skip the range under 3000 rpms it will give much better low end performance.
thanks dodge boy, ya i have factory stall converter and not sure if that number is the same since i put in a supercharger ?

So let me walk through the steps, please let me know if this is correct.

1. you press on the breaks hard
2. you press on the gas pedal until it reaches around 3,000 RPMs
3. while pressing the gas pedal at 3000 RPMs, you let go of the break and you floor it, and the car starts around 3,000 RPM's instead of dropping down working its way up.

Are those steps correct ?

Is stall converter basically when the car break pedal is pressed, you press on the gas and once the tire rotate just a bit, that is when the stall converter is at its limit which is the breaking point ?

Can i get a high stall converter with my factory 3.06 rear axel differential ?

Will this Converter only work with Drag radials or slicksters ? You can't do this high power launch on the street without spinning the tires correct ? Well i guess you can do this with Drag radials DOT approved right ?
 
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