From May 2017 could it be true

Discussion in 'Industry News and Dodge Press Releases.' started by Dodgeguy, Jan 27, 2018.

  1. Dodgeguy

    Dodgeguy Highway Star Site Supporter Level 1 Member Relations Photo Winner! MOTM Winner! Public Safety

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    http://www.thedrive.com/news/9836/100-octane-super-premium-fuel-is-coming-to-a-pump-near-you
    Oil companies and automakers are quietly collaborating to get higher-octane fuel into pumps all across the country. They’re pushing for higher octanes for their obvious benefits like extracting more power from less gas to meet rising mpg requirements and reduce emissions. The challenge is how to break the news to the public without tipping them off to the fact that it will cause a rise in gas prices across the board.

    Why would it affect the price of regular fuel? It’s likely that when a 100-octane fuel is introduced, 87 octane—the current “regular” grade gas—will be phased out. The idea is to make every car on the road burn higher-octane gas reducing CO2. Unfortunately, if your car wasn’t specifically engineered for higher-octane fuel, the difference in performance and efficiency will be minimal.
    GM global propulsion systems chief Dan Nicholson said last year, “Higher-octane fuels are the cheapest CO2 reduction. Fuels and engines must be designed as a total system. It makes absolutely no sense to have fuel out of the mix.”

    This is a small step towards clean energy while automakers continue innovating and working out the kinks of alternative fuels. Since internal combustion is still very much the standard, the industry is doing what it can to make that fuel cleaner.

    While this might be unfortunate news for drivers on a tight budget, it’s pretty good news for enthusiasts with high-power cars. With octanes around 100 more widely available, you’ll be able to squeeze all 840 horses out of your Dodge Challenger SRT Demon rather than settling for a mere 808 horsepower on 91 octane fuel.
     
  2. FastMikeR1

    FastMikeR1 Active Member MOTM Winner!

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    In Europe, they already have higher octane than here in the Americas. They also pay a lot higher price per liter than us.Time will tell, May is not that far away.
     
  3. Dodgeguy

    Dodgeguy Highway Star Site Supporter Level 1 Member Relations Photo Winner! MOTM Winner! Public Safety

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    The article was from last May. There was a member here that had something to do with the gasoline industry and he mentioned the companies were working to have only premium gas and that was a year or 2 ago.
     
  4. Dianna

    Dianna New Member

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    I bought my 2010 RT Challenger used 3 years ago, I did not receive a manual upon purchase. I have always put premium gas in car but recently I read an online manual and it indicated that my car should only be using regular gas...so I'm asking which gas should I be using and why not premium? Or why regular ?
     
  5. jklotz10

    jklotz10 Senior Member Member Relations MOTM Winner!

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    If you car has an automatic transmission and is still stock (no performance tuning / modifications) you should run 89 octane in the car as recommended by DODGE / FCA or whoever they are....what they say in their manual for the car.
    Using premium 91 or 93 octane will only drain your pocketbook a bit more but you won't get any benefits from the extra cash spent.
    'Octane' rating is a value which describes the threshold at which fuel will ignite under pressure. A lower octane fuel will ignite at a lower pressure than a higher octane fuel. If your car has had tuning adjustments for the sake of performance you usually need to run a higher octane. The engine spark has been set to ignite the fuel at a certain point in the compression stroke to take full advantage of the burning fuel for increased horsepower.
    Basically, you don't want the fuel to ignite too quickly in the compression stroke of the engine so you use a higher octane fuel to prevent knock (knock = fuel ignites during compression stroke prior to the spark plug firing, causing the ignition of fuel. The expanding gas vapor wants to push the piston back down when the crankshaft is trying to push it up). Knock is bad. Knock is evil. Bad, evil things are not good for Challengers unless they are the operators.
    In short, you will not get any benefit from using a higher octane fuel than what is recommended unless you have made performance adjustments and the revised 'tune' for the car requires a higher octane.
     

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