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Used mothers clay bar and Wolfgang total swirl remover and Wolfgang glaze on a Porter Cable DA type buffer.

Some before and after pics. A few wtr streaks in the one pic. The white is really hard to look at with the sun reflecting off of it now.

I still need to do the paint chip repair, paint sealant and wax.

I'll be using Wolfgang sealant and Pinnacle souveran wax.

A total of 23 hrs in all 3 steps so far. Whew, I'm beat...

IMG_20161218_191957.jpg


IMG_20161218_191734.jpg
 

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You did a great job. I need to do the Charger it looks like your before pics.
 

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You did a great job. I need to do the Charger it looks like your before pics.
Thanks. It takes forever, but I enjoy doing it.
 
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A before and after of the clay bar. All the flat surfaces of the car looked like this. The specks are actually iron dust from the rail road at my wife's work.


IMG_20161218_200403.jpg
 

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Great Job!
 
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A before and after of the clay bar. All the flat surfaces of the car looked like this. The specks are actually iron dust from the rail road at my wife's work.


View attachment 87068
Good job! Maybe try a decontamination product before clay and polish. Iron-X is a good one. I like your product choice. Those are top of the line! Souveran is one of my goto's. Nice correction too. Post up some full pics when you're finished.
 

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Good job! Maybe try a decontamination product before clay and polish. Iron-X is a good one. I like your product choice. Those are top of the line! Souveran is one of my goto's. Nice correction too. Post up some full pics when you're finished.
Thanks. I did use the ironx soap. It was cool watching it react with the iron. It really does turn purple. Here's some pics.
 

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IMG_20161202_155400036.jpg

IMG_20161202_152719183.jpg


Carpro iron-x soap in action. It removed some of the iron. I used a soap gun, then poured it directly onto a sponge and wiped the car down. I spent a few hrs doing it, keeping the car wet and soapy the whole time.
 

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I enjoy seeing the fruits of other DIY's labors. Nice work!

My detailer's supply company contact (Eric, owner of Autoality.com) offered a suggestion for me to try this year when I inquired about a carnauba wax topping a sealant; use Collinite #476 Super Double Coat Wax first, then, if I wanted a "harder candy shell" finish, to top it with a sealant.

His rationale I found interesting. A sealant will smooth out the car's finish to such an extent that the wax won't be able to bind as well, thus not last as long.

Collinite's waxes are so durable they're used as sealants. Thus, he suggested first the #476 to allow it to bind to the clear coat, then (if I wanted) a sealant.

I would think your combo of the Wolfgang Sealant and Pinnacle wax would work the same way. FYI - Your Wolfgang sealant is manufactured by Four Star; Four Star markets the same stuff under its own label UPP (Ultimate Paint Polish) for less than Wolfgang sells its sealant.
 
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I enjoy seeing the fruits of other DIY's labors. Nice work!

My detailer's supply company contact (Eric, owner of Autoality.com) offered a suggestion for me to try this year when I inquired about a carnauba wax topping a sealant; use Collinite #476 Super Double Coat Wax first, then, if I wanted a "harder candy shell" finish, to top it with a sealant.

His rationale I found interesting. A sealant will smooth out the car's finish to such an extent that the wax won't be able to bind as well, thus not last as long.

Collinite's waxes are so durable they're used as sealants. Thus, he suggested first the #476 to allow it to bind to the clear coat, then (if I wanted) a sealant.

I would think your combo of the Wolfgang Sealant and Pinnacle wax would work the same way. FYI - Your Wolfgang sealant is manufactured by Four Star; Four Star markets the same stuff under its own label UPP (Ultimate Paint Polish) for less than Wolfgang sells its sealant.

Point well taken. Perhaps with those products that would work. My reserve with this is a few things. The melting point if a common carnauba wax is approx 95°, while a common paint sealant is 280° due to its synthetic polymer make up. Sealants are typically harder than waxes too. For me, reason seems to dictate to apply the harder higher melting point product first, then the softer lower melting point second. The wax under the sealant would not allow the longer lasting product to bond to the paint, IMO, resulting in the sealant lasting no longer than a wax if the substrate component is weaker in nature. Much like putting floor tile over a soft wooden floor, the harder tile will move and fracture and not live a long life as it should. Just my opinion...
 
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I enjoy seeing the fruits of other DIY's labors. Nice work!

My detailer's supply company contact (Eric, owner of Autoality.com) offered a suggestion for me to try this year when I inquired about a carnauba wax topping a sealant; use Collinite #476 Super Double Coat Wax first, then, if I wanted a "harder candy shell" finish, to top it with a sealant.

His rationale I found interesting. A sealant will smooth out the car's finish to such an extent that the wax won't be able to bind as well, thus not last as long.

Collinite's waxes are so durable they're used as sealants. Thus, he suggested first the #476 to allow it to bind to the clear coat, then (if I wanted) a sealant.

I would think your combo of the Wolfgang Sealant and Pinnacle wax would work the same way. FYI - Your Wolfgang sealant is manufactured by Four Star; Four Star markets the same stuff under its own label UPP (Ultimate Paint Polish) for less than Wolfgang sells its sealant.

Thanks for the heads up on the UPP products.
 

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I would also like to add, neither the swirl remover or the glaze leaves any stains on black trim. Even if the buffer passed over the rocker trim at the bottom, it wiped off easily with a damp cloth.

This significantly reduces project time as I didn't have to tape off and/or cover up trim. A huge plus!
 
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Point well taken. Perhaps with those products that would work. My reserve with this is a few things. The melting point if a common carnauba wax is approx 95°, while a common paint sealant is 280° due to its synthetic polymer make up. Sealants are typically harder than waxes too. For me, reason seems to dictate to apply the harder higher melting point product first, then the softer lower melting point second. The wax under the sealant would not allow the longer lasting product to bond to the paint, IMO, resulting in the sealant lasting no longer than a wax if the substrate component is weaker in nature. Much like putting floor tile over a soft wooden floor, the harder tile will move and fracture and not live a long life as it should. Just my opinion...
I always use sealant then wax. And not a pure carnuba.
 
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Thanks. I did use the ironx soap. It was cool watching it react with the iron. It really does turn purple. Here's some pics.
Oh right. I read right over that in the title of your post. Sorry about that.
 

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Point well taken. Perhaps with those products that would work. My reserve with this is a few things. The melting point if a common carnauba wax is approx 95°, while a common paint sealant is 280° due to its synthetic polymer make up. Sealants are typically harder than waxes too. For me, reason seems to dictate to apply the harder higher melting point product first, then the softer lower melting point second. The wax under the sealant would not allow the longer lasting product to bond to the paint, IMO, resulting in the sealant lasting no longer than a wax if the substrate component is weaker in nature. Much like putting floor tile over a soft wooden floor, the harder tile will move and fracture and not live a long life as it should. Just my opinion...
Normal Carnauba waxes I'd agree with you. But in terms of the Collinite waxes (whether #476 or the more widely used #845) from what I understand they themselves act as sealants given the polymers and ingredients mixed in with the carnauba. I acknowledge the logic to your argument about the different melting points, but my detail supply guy was very specific in his argument that a sealant applied first would degrade the durability of the wax by preventing it from "gripping" properly.

At the end of the day, it all comes down to personal preference anyways.

I wasn't happy with the look or durability of the Collinite #845 applied over the UPP sealant, and spent most of the race/show season using just the sealant Thus, I'm going to reverse the order and go with the wax first (this time the #476) and then, if I feel I need additional protection, the UPP sealant over top, though because I'm striving for the "wetter deeper" look, I'll probably skip the sealant unless the #476 doesn't live up to its reputation (doubtful given it's a Collinite product).
 
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Cost of these products??????
 

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Cost of these products??????
Four Star UPP retails at $29.99 (though with my Detailer's Club membership at Autoality.com I get it for substantially less)

Collinite #476 retails for $19.99 for a 9 oz can (put it on thin, thin, thin), #845 about a buck less. I get better deals at Autoality.com with all products, including these.
 

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