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I bought a upr billet catch can and installed it and drove it to work and back (about 40 minutes each way)for one day. I noticed that the exhaust note was muffled and I couldn't accelerate as quickly as before. I wonder if the oil catch can is causing some sort of restriction from thw crank case gas ventilation. I hit the internet and didn't find a definitive answer. Convincing arguments on both sides. But in the process I learned the 392 is port injected and that made me wonder why I would use a catch can anyway if the valves are gonna be cleaned by the fuel injectors?
Has anybody else felt like their catch can has robbed them of power? Did you go back to sock pcv set up or try a different catch can?
On day#1, I installed a UPR catch can on my 2018 Challenger R/T Scat, with A-8 tranny. The car now has 10k on the clock, and it has experienced several long and spirited round trip runs in the heat of summer.

Inside the UPR catch can is nothing more than a perforated metal baffle. PCV flow enters, and is drawn down through the baffle holes, then drawn up to the top of the canister, and out to the intake. Any crankcase oil present, and due to gravity, simply drips through the baffle holes, and settles in the canister bottom. To date, the intake-to-canister section of hose contains the normaal oily PVC residue. Yet, the canister-to-intake section of hose remains clean and oil-free. I have periodically swabbed the inside of that hose section with a Q-tip (each time I empty the canister) to see if there is any oil passing through the catch can, and into the intake manifold. To my surprise, the Q-tip comes out clean every time. Any newer model UPR canisters that may have any type of "filter media" installed could possibly restrict PCV flow. But I wouldn't think a noticeable drop in engine performance would be evident, unless the PCV flow is blocked in some way. Then, I would think crankcase over-pressure would eventually cause oil leaks somewhere.

Side Note: A couple years ago, I read about someone suggesting that 392 owners pull Fuses # (29 & 31), located in the Front Power Distribution Panel, wait a few minutes, and re-install them. "Fuse #29" (Transmission), and "Fuse #31 (Engine Module). This fuse pulling trick takes the engine PCM and automatic transmission performance back to factory settings, so they can re-learn owner's driving habits, and supposedly a host of other things. I tried the guys' suggestion for Fuse #31, and I immediately noticed a positive change in the way my Scat performed. In other words, it seemed that she went from a little sluggish, back to the better performing factory settings I enjoyed on day #1. Try that and see if it helps. There are quite a few Youtube videos out there that give other people's opinions on whether this does or doesn't help in your situation.
 

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I bought a upr billet catch can and installed it and drove it to work and back (about 40 minutes each way)for one day. I noticed that the exhaust note was muffled and I couldn't accelerate as quickly as before. I wonder if the oil catch can is causing some sort of restriction from thw crank case gas ventilation. I hit the internet and didn't find a definitive answer. Convincing arguments on both sides. But in the process I learned the 392 is port injected and that made me wonder why I would use a catch can anyway if the valves are gonna be cleaned by the fuel injectors?
Has anybody else felt like their catch can has robbed them of power? Did you go back to sock pcv set up or try a different catch can?
I wonder alsl if catch cans can cause throttle lag on a srt 392?
 

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Side Note: A couple years ago, I read about someone suggesting that 392 owners pull Fuses # (29 & 31), located in the Front Power Distribution Panel, wait a few minutes, and re-install them. "Fuse #29" (Transmission), and "Fuse #31 (Engine Module). This fuse pulling trick takes the engine PCM and automatic transmission performance back to factory settings, so they can re-learn owner's driving habits, and supposedly a host of other things. I tried the guys' suggestion for Fuse #31, and I immediately noticed a positive change in the way my Scat performed. In other words, it seemed that she went from a little sluggish, back to the better performing factory settings I enjoyed on day #1. Try that and see if it helps. There are quite a few Youtube videos out there that give other people's opinions on whether this does or doesn't help in your situation.
Not to go off-topic here... but, pulling these fuses (in my 2020 R/T) ended-up tripping my TCM into what a tech described as "shipping mode". What this is, I do not know? What I do know, is that it effected the default mode shifting routine. The TCM and ETC had to be recalibrated by the dealership. Works perfectly now; though I prefer the pre-2016 TCM update (default mode) shifting routine. I was advised by the service manger to disconnect the battery before pulling fuses.
 

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The idea of burning the vapors from the crankcase was one of the first emission controls put on a car, maybe 1968 was the first year. In that vapor that are hydrocarbons that are more air friendly if they are burned. One of these days I going to have a peek in the intake of my wife’s car which does not have a catch can.

One reason I brought up egr causing a gunk build up is my son had an Olds Aurora where the egr dumped in very close the the throttle body. The throttle blade got sticky from a build up from the EGR.
 

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2012 Challenger R/T Classic 5.7L,Kook LT,Borla ATAK,Comp 270 cam,Hellcat valve train,AiraidCAI
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Nope. Good old US of A! She also use to spray water out of her butt while swimming. She called it her "white whale". Fabulous stuff!
Oh, this is great stuff. Don't know if it belongs in this forum, but I like it.
 

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2020 Dodge Challenger Hellraisin Scat Pack
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The idea of burning the vapors from the crankcase was one of the first emission controls put on a car, maybe 1968 was the first year. In that vapor that are hydrocarbons that are more air friendly if they are burned. One of these days I going to have a peek in the intake of my wife’s car which does not have a catch can.

One reason I brought up egr causing a gunk build up is my son had an Olds Aurora where the egr dumped in very close the the throttle body. The throttle blade got sticky from a build up from the EGR.
That the PCV system helps emissions is one thing. It also subjects the crankcase to lower pressure and this encourages water in the oil to boil and the water vapor to then flow out of the crankcase.

Prior to PCV engines used a draft tube which hung down and the lower end was in the air stream and cut at an angle which helped to create a mini low pressure zone at the tube end.

Did not work very well.

The PCV system keeps the engine cleaner, prolongs the useful life of the oil, helps keep sludge formation away, and just overall prolongs engine life.

A few ounces of oil through the engine being the "trade off" of having a PCV system is of no real significance.
 
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