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1937 ram, 1970 340 Duster, 1993 stealth, 2010 challenger rt, 2014 ram
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Discussion Starter #1
Does anybody out their have any recommendations on PCM repair. I am not looking for any performance mods, just a proper working PCM.
 

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1937 ram, 1970 340 Duster, 1993 stealth, 2010 challenger rt, 2014 ram
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Discussion Starter #3
As stated in 1st post, I am not looking for performance upgrade. But I do need repair of accessory function repair ie voltage regulation, I am generating over 15v while engine is running, not good for HID operation.
 

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1937 ram, 1970 340 Duster, 1993 stealth, 2010 challenger rt, 2014 ram
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Discussion Starter #8
Your right jkelly16 the PCM does control voltage. Thanks the blaster master I will check Diablo & the second option Monday. As for fs1 I just received my money back, customer service is garbage still waiting on my PCM return. They are the reason I started this thread. Been dealing with them since Jan 15. I have been doing nothing except looking at my beast for a month now. I would say driving me crazy but I can't even drive it.
 

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Make : DODGE Model : CHALLENGER Year : 2012
Build Dates : 2010-10-21 - 2014-07-07
NHTSA CAMPAIGN ID Number : 17V435000
Date Owner's Notified: 2018-02-12Date Received by ODI: 2017-07-10Date Added to Database: 2017-07-11
Manufacturers Involved: Chrysler (FCA US LLC)
Manufacturer's Responsible for the Recall:
Manufacturer Campaign Number: T36
Component: ELECTRICAL SYSTEM:ALTERNATOR/GENERATOR/REGULATOR
Potential Number Of Units Affected : 442214
Summary:
Chrysler "FCA US LLC" is recalling certain model year 2011-2014 Dodge Challenger, Dodge Charger, Chrysler 300, Dodge Durango, and 2012-2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee vehicles. The affected vehicles have electro-hydraulic power steering "EHPS" and are equipped with a 5.7L or a 3.6L engine and a 160, 180 or 220 amp alternator. In the affected vehicles, the alternator may suddenly fail.
Do you have a vehicle within the time frame here? One of the side effects of the alternator failure is voltage readings over 14.2 Volts and "noise" on the CAN bus. Meaning a AC sinewave present which will wreak havoc on logic circuits. This is caused by shorted diodes or failing diodes in the alternator. The PCM regulates "LOGIC" voltages, not main operational voltages. That is done by the alternator.
-John
 

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1937 ram, 1970 340 Duster, 1993 stealth, 2010 challenger rt, 2014 ram
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Discussion Starter #10
Maybe I will clarify my ride is a 2010 RT. My search at Diablo only steers me to 15 & newer. My car has a registration date in Feb so the build date had to be before that. Sometime in the year 09
 

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Your right jkelly16 the PCM does control voltage. Thanks the blaster master I will check Diablo & the second option Monday. As for fs1 I just received my money back, customer service is garbage still waiting on my PCM return. They are the reason I started this thread. Been dealing with them since Jan 15. I have been doing nothing except looking at my beast for a month now. I would say driving me crazy but I can't even drive it.
January 15th!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! damn
 

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1937 ram, 1970 340 Duster, 1993 stealth, 2010 challenger rt, 2014 ram
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Discussion Starter #12
Tell me about it I am going through withdrawals
 

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Never live and die by recall date ranges. Early production cars can have leftover parts from the year before and late end-of-the-year production models can have parts destined for the new model year. Been that way since WWII.
The only way to know is by the serial number on the alternator and the VIN No. of the car. If the car was bought used, any guess is fair game.
-John
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I have already checked the VIN for recalls the only ones that came up were air bags inflaters.
 

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Sure looks like the PCM controls the alternator in this diagram:
251731
 

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Sure looks like the PCM controls the alternator in this diagram:
View attachment 251731
Nice.... I just stuck my O-scope on the field control wire on my Jeep alternator (2018 Jeep Grand Cherokee) and they are using PWM (pulse width modulation) on that wire to control output. More shit to go wrong. I would have never thought they would go to such extremes. So my dealership friend says its to save gas by cutting down on alternator load and therefore engine load. It is also supposed to make the battery last longer. When I turned on every electrical load the vehicle has to offer, the signal becomes nearly steady-state on. Incredible.o_O
Here is what I see really bad about all this; One alternator part number can service all the FCA vehicles. Not so for the PCM's All vehicle models are different depending on what it is in. Can't put a Jeep PCM with auto transmission into a Challenger with an M6. Again... the DIY guy is screwed.:mad: Not to mention the price of these damn things. $$$$
Oh yea, one more thing. The original poster here may end up replacing the alternator anyway because when the alternator is constantly in "over-voltage mode" the load resistor within the alternator overheats and loses its integrity. So, what happens is the vehicle alternator will now charge but at a lower current output. That in turn means that it will not support full charging when things like the AC or headlamps being on. Hopefully, that will not be the case.
Thanks for posting that circuit.
-John
 

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Nice.... I just stuck my O-scope on the field control wire on my Jeep alternator (2018 Jeep Grand Cherokee) and they are using PWM (pulse width modulation) on that wire to control output. More shit to go wrong. I would have never thought they would go to such extremes. So my dealership friend says its to save gas by cutting down on alternator load and therefore engine load. It is also supposed to make the battery last longer. When I turned on every electrical load the vehicle has to offer, the signal becomes nearly steady-state on. Incredible.o_O
Here is what I see really bad about all this; One alternator part number can service all the FCA vehicles. Not so for the PCM's All vehicle models are different depending on what it is in. Can't put a Jeep PCM with auto transmission into a Challenger with an M6. Again... the DIY guy is screwed.:mad: Not to mention the price of these damn things. $$$$
Oh yea, one more thing. The original poster here may end up replacing the alternator anyway because when the alternator is constantly in "over-voltage mode" the load resistor within the alternator overheats and loses its integrity. So, what happens is the vehicle alternator will now charge but at a lower current output. That in turn means that it will not support full charging when things like the AC or headlamps being on. Hopefully, that will not be the case.
Thanks for posting that circuit.
-John
Yes it could still be a bad alternator (diodes, etc) messing with the PCM control/feedback circuit. I would actually lean more towards some problem other than the PCM. They just don't go bad very often that I have experienced or heard of.
 

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Yes it could still be a bad alternator (diodes, etc) messing with the PCM control/feedback circuit. I would actually lean more towards some problem other than the PCM. They just don't go bad very often that I have experienced or heard of.
He can check for bad diodes with a regular DVM. You put the volt meter on the battery but use the AC scale. That way, if there is alternating current coming out of the alternator, it will be superimposed on the DC voltage. Any reading over
0.6 volts means a diode is bad. Or the ripple capacitor within the alternator could also be bad.
-John
 

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