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A bit long, but to me worth reading.


I TALKED TO A MAN TODAY . . .
I talked with a man today, an 80+ year old man. I asked him if there was anything I can get him while this Corona virus scare was gripping America.
He simply smiled, looked away and said:
"Let me tell you what I need! [pause] I need to believe, at some point, this country my generation fought for [pause] I need to believe this nation we handed safely to our children and their children [pause] . . .
I need to know this generation will quit being a bunch of sissies . . . that they respect what they've been given . . . that they've earned what others sacrificed for."
I wasn't sure where the conversation was going or if it was going anywhere at all. So, I sat there, quietly observing.
"You know, I was a little boy during WWII. Those were scary days. We didn't know if we were going to be speaking English, German or Japanese at the end of the war. There was no certainty, no guarantees like Americans enjoy today.
And no home went without sacrifice or loss. Every house, up and down every street, had someone in harm's way. Maybe their Daddy was a soldier, maybe their son was a sailor, maybe it was an uncle. Sometimes it was the whole damn family . . . fathers, sons, uncles . . .
Having someone, you love, sent off to war . . . it wasn't less frightening than it is today. It was scary as Hell. If anything, it was more frightening. We didn't have battlefront news. We didn't have email or cellphones. You sent them away and you hoped...you prayed. You may not hear from them for months, if ever. Sometimes a mother was getting her son's letters the same day Dad was comforting her over their child's death.
And we sacrificed. You couldn't buy things. Everything was rationed. You were only allowed so much milk per month, only so much bread, toilet paper. EVERYTHING was restricted for the war effort. And what you weren't using, what you didn't need, things you threw away, they were saved and sorted for the war effort. My generation was the original recycling movement in America.
And we had viruses back then...serious viruses. Things like polio, measles, and such. It was nothing to walk to school and pass a house or two that was quarantined. We didn't shut down our schools. We didn't shut down our cities. We carried on, without masks, without hand sanitizer. And do you know what? We persevered. We overcame. We didn't attack our President, we came together. We rallied around the flag for the war. Thick or thin, we were in it to win. And we would lose more boys in an hour of combat than we lose in entire wars today."
He slowly looked away again. Maybe I saw a small tear in the corner of his eye. Then he continued:
"Today's kids don't know sacrifice. They think sacrifice is not having coverage on their phone while they freely drive across the country. Today's kids are selfish and spoiled. In my generation, we looked out for our elders. We helped out with single moms whose husbands were either at war or dead from war. Today's kids rush [to] the store, buying everything they can . . . no concern for anyone but themselves. It's shameful the way Americans behave these days. None of them deserve the sacrifices their granddads made.
So, no I don't need anything. I appreciate your offer but, I know I've been through worse things than this virus. But maybe I should be asking you, what can I do to help you? Do you have enough pop to get through this, enough steak? Will you be able to survive with 113 channels on your TV?"
I smiled, fighting back a tear of my own . . . now humbled by a man in his 80's. All I could do was thank him for the history lesson, leave my number for emergency and leave with my ego firmly tucked in my rear.
I talked to a man today. A real man. An American man from an era long gone and forgotten.
We will never understand the sacrifices. We will never fully earn their sacrifices. But we should work harder to learn about them . . . learn from them . . . . . to respect them.
~ Courtesy of Craig Dew
 

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A bit long, but to me worth reading.


I TALKED TO A MAN TODAY . . .
I talked with a man today, an 80+ year old man. I asked him if there was anything I can get him while this Corona virus scare was gripping America.
He simply smiled, looked away and said:
"Let me tell you what I need! [pause] I need to believe, at some point, this country my generation fought for [pause] I need to believe this nation we handed safely to our children and their children [pause] . . .
I need to know this generation will quit being a bunch of sissies . . . that they respect what they've been given . . . that they've earned what others sacrificed for."
I wasn't sure where the conversation was going or if it was going anywhere at all. So, I sat there, quietly observing.
"You know, I was a little boy during WWII. Those were scary days. We didn't know if we were going to be speaking English, German or Japanese at the end of the war. There was no certainty, no guarantees like Americans enjoy today.
And no home went without sacrifice or loss. Every house, up and down every street, had someone in harm's way. Maybe their Daddy was a soldier, maybe their son was a sailor, maybe it was an uncle. Sometimes it was the whole damn family . . . fathers, sons, uncles . . .
Having someone, you love, sent off to war . . . it wasn't less frightening than it is today. It was scary as Hell. If anything, it was more frightening. We didn't have battlefront news. We didn't have email or cellphones. You sent them away and you hoped...you prayed. You may not hear from them for months, if ever. Sometimes a mother was getting her son's letters the same day Dad was comforting her over their child's death.
And we sacrificed. You couldn't buy things. Everything was rationed. You were only allowed so much milk per month, only so much bread, toilet paper. EVERYTHING was restricted for the war effort. And what you weren't using, what you didn't need, things you threw away, they were saved and sorted for the war effort. My generation was the original recycling movement in America.
And we had viruses back then...serious viruses. Things like polio, measles, and such. It was nothing to walk to school and pass a house or two that was quarantined. We didn't shut down our schools. We didn't shut down our cities. We carried on, without masks, without hand sanitizer. And do you know what? We persevered. We overcame. We didn't attack our President, we came together. We rallied around the flag for the war. Thick or thin, we were in it to win. And we would lose more boys in an hour of combat than we lose in entire wars today."
He slowly looked away again. Maybe I saw a small tear in the corner of his eye. Then he continued:
"Today's kids don't know sacrifice. They think sacrifice is not having coverage on their phone while they freely drive across the country. Today's kids are selfish and spoiled. In my generation, we looked out for our elders. We helped out with single moms whose husbands were either at war or dead from war. Today's kids rush [to] the store, buying everything they can . . . no concern for anyone but themselves. It's shameful the way Americans behave these days. None of them deserve the sacrifices their granddads made.
So, no I don't need anything. I appreciate your offer but, I know I've been through worse things than this virus. But maybe I should be asking you, what can I do to help you? Do you have enough pop to get through this, enough steak? Will you be able to survive with 113 channels on your TV?"
I smiled, fighting back a tear of my own . . . now humbled by a man in his 80's. All I could do was thank him for the history lesson, leave my number for emergency and leave with my ego firmly tucked in my rear.
I talked to a man today. A real man. An American man from an era long gone and forgotten.
We will never understand the sacrifices. We will never fully earn their sacrifices. But we should work harder to learn about them . . . learn from them . . . . . to respect them.
~ Courtesy of Craig Dew
Do you have a link for that? It needs to be posted in better locations than on a Challenger forum...
 

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If you go to a performance parts website, and they ask you for your car specs (year, make, model, sub-model, etc), and you put them in....

year - 2015
make - Dodge
model - Challenger
sub-model - SRT 392

Why does it then ask you engine size ??? It's not like you're gonna have (or want) an SRT 392 with the 5.7 engine in it.....

and why when it does, is the only choice 6.4l ??

And if ya put in Hellcat, it gives you 2 engine options...6.2l / 376 cid or 6.2l / 378 cid...........


Things that make ya go Hmmmm.........
 

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If you go to a performance parts website, and they ask you for your car specs (year, make, model, sub-model, etc), and you put them in....

year - 2015
make - Dodge
model - Challenger
sub-model - SRT 392

Why does it then ask you engine size ??? It's not like you're gonna have (or want) an SRT 392 with the 5.7 engine in it.....

and why when it does, is the only choice 6.4l ??

And if ya put in Hellcat, it gives you 2 engine options...6.2l / 376 cid or 6.2l / 378 cid...........


Things that make ya go Hmmmm.........
You obviously go to the wrong performance parts websites...
 

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I guess....it was Jegs....their search engine is all jacked up.....tried using filters to narrow things down, and it still shows you tons of stuff not within the parameters

and Summit Racing stops at Challenger.....so you get to sort thru all kinds of crap their too
 

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I guess....it was Jegs....their search engine is all jacked up.....tried using filters to narrow things down, and it still shows you tons of stuff not within the parameters

and Summit Racing stops at Challenger.....so you get to sort thru all kinds of crap their too
I usually go to Summit, and I don't bother entering my vehicle to do a search. I just find what I'm looking for, the phone them. Most everything I look for will fit a Challenger, but never show up doing a "by vehicle" search, and that's the telephone part of it.
 

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Was trying to look at some rims and got tired of the filters not working well......
 

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Was trying to look at some rims and got tired of the filters not working well......
I wanted to put American Mags on my Shaker, which run less than $300 each for every car I saw on their site for the wheels I liked. For a Challenger they are over $1,000 apiece...
 

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No link, it was on Facebook, just copy and paste wherever you want.
Bummer, I don't do Facebook, and I don't want to link it to here. I believe it needs to be posted in the comments on news websites.
 

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25 Random Silly Thoughts To Ponder Over Whenever You’re Really, Really Bored
 

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Waiting for beautiful fall colors!
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A bit long, but to me worth reading.


I TALKED TO A MAN TODAY . . .
I talked with a man today, an 80+ year old man. I asked him if there was anything I can get him while this Corona virus scare was gripping America.
He simply smiled, looked away and said:
"Let me tell you what I need! [pause] I need to believe, at some point, this country my generation fought for [pause] I need to believe this nation we handed safely to our children and their children [pause] . . .
I need to know this generation will quit being a bunch of sissies . . . that they respect what they've been given . . . that they've earned what others sacrificed for."
I wasn't sure where the conversation was going or if it was going anywhere at all. So, I sat there, quietly observing.
"You know, I was a little boy during WWII. Those were scary days. We didn't know if we were going to be speaking English, German or Japanese at the end of the war. There was no certainty, no guarantees like Americans enjoy today.
And no home went without sacrifice or loss. Every house, up and down every street, had someone in harm's way. Maybe their Daddy was a soldier, maybe their son was a sailor, maybe it was an uncle. Sometimes it was the whole damn family . . . fathers, sons, uncles . . .
Having someone, you love, sent off to war . . . it wasn't less frightening than it is today. It was scary as Hell. If anything, it was more frightening. We didn't have battlefront news. We didn't have email or cellphones. You sent them away and you hoped...you prayed. You may not hear from them for months, if ever. Sometimes a mother was getting her son's letters the same day Dad was comforting her over their child's death.
And we sacrificed. You couldn't buy things. Everything was rationed. You were only allowed so much milk per month, only so much bread, toilet paper. EVERYTHING was restricted for the war effort. And what you weren't using, what you didn't need, things you threw away, they were saved and sorted for the war effort. My generation was the original recycling movement in America.
And we had viruses back then...serious viruses. Things like polio, measles, and such. It was nothing to walk to school and pass a house or two that was quarantined. We didn't shut down our schools. We didn't shut down our cities. We carried on, without masks, without hand sanitizer. And do you know what? We persevered. We overcame. We didn't attack our President, we came together. We rallied around the flag for the war. Thick or thin, we were in it to win. And we would lose more boys in an hour of combat than we lose in entire wars today."
He slowly looked away again. Maybe I saw a small tear in the corner of his eye. Then he continued:
"Today's kids don't know sacrifice. They think sacrifice is not having coverage on their phone while they freely drive across the country. Today's kids are selfish and spoiled. In my generation, we looked out for our elders. We helped out with single moms whose husbands were either at war or dead from war. Today's kids rush [to] the store, buying everything they can . . . no concern for anyone but themselves. It's shameful the way Americans behave these days. None of them deserve the sacrifices their granddads made.
So, no I don't need anything. I appreciate your offer but, I know I've been through worse things than this virus. But maybe I should be asking you, what can I do to help you? Do you have enough pop to get through this, enough steak? Will you be able to survive with 113 channels on your TV?"
I smiled, fighting back a tear of my own . . . now humbled by a man in his 80's. All I could do was thank him for the history lesson, leave my number for emergency and leave with my ego firmly tucked in my rear.
I talked to a man today. A real man. An American man from an era long gone and forgotten.
We will never understand the sacrifices. We will never fully earn their sacrifices. But we should work harder to learn about them . . . learn from them . . . . . to respect them.
~ Courtesy of Craig Dew
Agree with all of this......thanks for posting.
 
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