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Discussion Starter #41
The diff? Or the cutout valve? Neither will make a misfire in the engine or cause the code.
Im sorry you live in a place that no one knows how to fix/work on cars. This is ridicules.
The this is there’s no real sound coming from the engine.
This car has a recall for evap recall. Any chance that it could be that?
 

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The this is there’s no real sound coming from the engine.
This car has a recall for evap recall. Any chance that it could be that?
With the benefit of more info that you were prompted to change the plugs on #2 due to a misfire suggests there is something -- I don't mean to alarm you but -- serious going on.

As an aside when you replaced the plugs on #2 you should have used the same plugs that you removed. Mopar plugs. And the gap should have been checked.

In these cases my advice is to try to pin point where the noise is coming from. A mechanic's stethoscope can really help in this.

If the noise is coming from inside the engine and from the either upper part of the engine, from under the valve cover and around the #2 cylinder area, or when you probe along the block the noise appears most evident in the #2 cylinker area, that strongly suggests there is more going on and further investigation is necessary.

You can do a compression test. You have to be careful. You start out with a cold engine that has not run for a while. The initial cylinders you test can deliver "low" numbers. Then as you progress the numbers from other cylinders get better. This can arise as the engine is cranked -- of course with the plugs removed -- oil gets onto the cylinder walls and this helps the piston/cylinder "seal" better.

But in this situation you are looking for a big difference between the other cylinders and the suspected bad cylinder.

After a compression test a leak down test can be done. As the suspected bad cylinder is pressurized you might hear -- with the oil cap off -- sounds of air leaking from inside the engine. This suggests the rings are bad. Air sounds at the intake -- somewhat exposed -- is a bad intake valve. Or at the exhaust a bad exhaust valve.

The misfire most likely isn't ring related. Intake valves seldom go bad. But an exhaust valve problem is not unknown. A co-worker with a 100K mile Subie reported a misfire and tried various things with no success. Engine "teardown" found a burned exhaust valve. Just out of the blue. The bad valve was replaced and the engine ran just fine.

If there is no air leak but yet the compression test finds the cylinder pressure low compared to the other cylinders this can be due to a bad valve lifter/cam lobe. The cylinder just doesn't fill well because the valve action is compromised.

Any signs of low compression or a leak during a leak down test will almost certainly require some further investigation to diagnose. (Years ago the engine in my D200 pickup -- a used state highway department truck -- started "ticking". Eventually I removed the intake manifold and exposed the valley between the cylinder banks. I could see daylight between some cam bearings. The cam bearing shells had gone away -- probably from the engine idling so much -- this lowered oil pressure to the lifters to the point they "ticked".)

If a cam lobe/lifter is suspected a proper sample of engine oil can be obtained and sent out for analysis. If the ferrous metal ppm is "high" this can be due to cam lobe/lifter wear.
 

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What year is the car? 36,000 miles would be under warranty unless you are past 5 years old.
 
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